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There is no need to make an internal encoding comply with utf8 or any standardized encoding since it is internal. Even with simple code snippets the ruby 1.9 solution has caused too much pain to even consider it as an eligible option. I personally rather switch to groovy or python than ruby 1.9. The way Ruby 1.9 handles encodings sucks. But I think as English speakers, we are usually sheltered from the problem because most programming languages are English centric. I'd say a good 5% of development time on a new Ruby 1.9 project of mine Nike Jackets New

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wooster 1639 days ago link

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All good points. But, my purposes aren't everyone's, and I'm not convinced there's a paradigm that would suit both usage patterns.

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harpastum 1639 days ago linkalextgordon 1639 days ago link

'' ('SS', which isn't necessarily reversible) or that in Turkish '' capitalizes to 'I', but 'i' capitalizes to ''. Python 3 and Java have taken Nike Tracksuit Tech the 'one true internal encoding' path and while hardly free of warts, it's an approach that is practically saner. If it isn't working that way, then I think there's a bug.

xtho 1639 days ago link

It's not. UTF (816) is. This of curse means that your application has to keep track of encodings. Basically for every string you keep in your application, you need to also keep track what it is encoded in. Strings don't worry about encoding. String operations don't worry about it. Only I/O worries about encoding. So whenever you get data from the outside, you need to know what encoding it is in and then you decode it to convert it to a string. Unicode was specifically made so that it can be used to represent every encoding, but it turns out that it can't correctly represent some Japanese encodings.3) Store an encoding with each string and expose the strings contents and the encodingThis is what ruby 1.9 does. You would transcode all incoming and outgoing data to and from that encoding. Thank you. And I was almost persuaded by it. In fact I was persuaded for about 5 minutes after reading it. But at the last second, a thought occurred to me: if there's a deficiency in Unicode that prevents its use for Japanese, isn't the right solution to just fix that deficiency?I mean, Unicode is meant to be an abstract representation of glyphs, separate from any encoding, that works for all of Earth's languages. It's tailor made to be a programming language's internal representation of a string. OK, "break" is probably too strong a word for the state of Ruby 1.9. And in the real world, fixing an international politicized standard like Unicode is probably impossible. So I can see that this pragmatic solution might have been the only one available. Even the developers of Ruby have to worry about the fact that LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE (U+00E9) is the same as LATIN SMALL LETTER E (U+0065) COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT (U+0301); it doesn't begin to address the capitalization of Nike Jacket Purple

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that as long as _everything_ is UTF 8, then I'll be okay, but good luck enforcing that! Especially since the whole word seems to default to ASCII, while actually _using_ multi byte chars anyway. I think I've got it now, but no, not really. It just works on my development machine. On my server, where it actually counts, I'm getting garbage where I should be getting an accent. I've spend two days now just trying to figure out how to debug something like that!

It seems the most obvious solution is to store strings in a standard encoding (say UTF 8) and to always convert strings to it at the time of their creation. Is there a technical reason why Ruby doesn't do this?

has been spent dealing with strings. I've taken to the idea Nike Hoodie Gray And Black

A rant about Ruby 1

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